House cleaning quote for Swan House in Atlanta

Swan House in Atlanta, GA

Location – Atlanta, GA
Built in – 1928
Square footage – 15,000
Bi-weekly cleaning quote – $1,500

We sent Amanda and Neil of Atlanta Eco Cleaners to the Swan House, in Atlanta to get their opinion of what a cleaning quote for that beautiful home would be. Here’s Amanda’s story:

Last month my partner, Neil, and I went to the Atlanta History Center to take the self-guided tour of The Swan House along with my two youngest daughters, Avie and Paisley. We had a brilliant time and learned so much— the house was set up with live characters reminiscent of the 1930’s.

Neil and Amanda, owners of Atlanta Eco Cleaners

The Swan House was built in 1928 as a home for the Inman family, who were wealthy heirs to a large cotton brokerage fortune. Unfortunately, just three years after completion, Edward Inman passed away. His wife, Emily, had her children and grandchildren move in with her, and she lived in the home until her death at age 84 in 1965. The Atlanta Historical Society then purchased the home, land, and all the furnishings and opened it to the public a year later. Almost everything in the home belonged to the Inman’s.

Phillip Trammell Shutze designed the house, adapting Italian and English classical styles to accommodate 20th century living. Many considered the Swan House to be his finest residential work and I agree! The home was full of ornate carvings, beautiful marble flooring, winding staircase, and fireplaces in every room.

It was by far the most beautiful home I have ever been in!

The Swan House has been used as a film location for The Hunger Games, the 1980’s film Little Darlings, and the finish line of the 19th season of The Amazing Race.

Cleaning Quote

We had to take a lot into consideration when providing a quote for this magnificent home. There was so much detail, from the carvings to the fireplaces in every room.

The Entryway and Hall have a black and white marble floor and a curved, free standing staircase with wrought iron spindles. The ceilings were at least 50 feet high with massive carvings and molding.

The Library was a recreated 18th century room with an antique 17th century carved over mantel and carvings throughout the room with cypress paneling. There were walls full of books and trophies. The floors were hardwood with a large area rug.

“I don’t know why it’s called the Morning Room– I could stay in there all day!”

The Morning Room has hardwood flooring, a cove ceiling, plaster work, and carvings. The furnishings were a mixture of 17th and 18th century styles. From the 17th century candelabra to the 18th century bulls-eye mirrors, the furnishings must be handled with great care.

The Dining Room has hand painted English wallpaper, a large Aubusson rug, and plaid draperies. The ceilings are very high throughout the entire home. This room contained 18th century swan tables which is what inspired the Swan motif throughout the home. It too has hardwood floors.

The Butler’s Pantry is where the large refrigerator-freezer is located. This is where the servants stored the silver and dishes. The flooring in the butler’s pantry was a type of stone, possibly quartz.

9-year-old Paisley enjoys the upgraded kitchen

The Kitchen was redone in the 1950’s, but the Magic Stove from 1936 was replaced as well as the 1929 refrigerator. The flooring was also stone. The sink was a very large stainless steel commercial sink.  I was surprised that it wasn’t as grand as the kitchens are today. I am assuming this is because the family didn’t ever go in there.

Emily and her husband Edward had adjoining bedrooms. Emily’s bedroom and bathroom were painted faux marbling and she had the artist paint swans, stars and draperies as well. The bathroom has tile flooring, a shower and a bath. The bedroom has a fireplace, hardwood flooring and a large area rug.

Avie (in blue) and Paisley enjoy the old-fashioned toys in the Grandchildren’s Bedroom

The Grandchildren’s bedroom was very large. Hardwood floors, fireplace and bathroom with tile flooring, and a very large area rug.

The third floor served as the maid’s residence. There is a laundry room, a bathroom and a bedroom. All hardwood floors and less decoration. Very plain.

Each room boasted very high ceilings, ornate moldings, draperies, hardwood flooring with area rugs, fireplaces, and all furniture was from the 17th and 18th century.

Due to the fact, there is no other home in Atlanta that compares to the complexity of the Swan House, we could not quote the normal rate. Generally, we have flat rates based on the number of bedrooms in the customer’s home. This home however, must be quoted based on square footage. The Swan House would be very time consuming due to the antique furnishings throughout and the high places that must be cleaned.

At 15,000 square feet, the total would come to $1,500 for a cleaning of the whole home, excluding the glass on the windows and the patios.

We decided to quote this home based on the square footage price we generally give to commercial quotes and post construction quotes only, which is between $0.05-$0.10 cents per square foot. We decided to go with the upper end of the pricing for the simple reasoning of details.

Paisley (9) and Avie (10) are impressed by the entryway

We estimated that the rate for this home would be $0.10 per square foot. At 15,000 square feet, the total would come to $1,500 for a cleaning of the whole home, excluding the glass on the windows and the patios.

Amanda and Neil of Atlanta Eco Cleaners care about providing high-quality, eco-friendly cleaning services. If you’re in the Atlanta area, be sure to book them for your next cleaning service. They promise not to compare your humble abode to the Swan House.

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